Is a physiologist a doctor?

What a physiologist does

Physiology (from the Greek φύσις (physis), meaning ‘nature, origin’, and -λογία (-logia), meaning ‘study of’) is the scientific study of the physical and chemical functions and mechanisms that take place within a living system, responsible for the origin, development, and progression of life.[1][2][3][4]

Historically, physiology is one of the foundations upon which all biological and medical sciences have been built.[5][6] Recently, there have been intense debates about the vitality of physiology as a discipline (is it alive or dead?).[7] If physiology is perhaps less visible today than during the golden age of the 19th century, it is largely because the field has given rise to some of the most active domains of biological and medical sciences today, such as neuroscience, endocrinology, and immunology. [8] In addition, physiology is still viewed as an integrative discipline, which can be grouped into a coherent framework of data from several different domains.[9][10][9][10

What is a physiologist

Physiology is a multidisciplinary science, which uses different languages and studies a set of emergent properties that do not arise from the simple sum of biophysical or biochemical data, but from the selection of those that are really significant over the background noise.

In this 2nd edition, a global perspective of the homeostasis of the organism, which is the distinctive character of physiology, is shown, without claiming that the whole is an exhaustive treatise. In addition, the main physiological variables are identified and defined and cause-effect relationships are established between them, from the most immediate to the most complex.

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This textbook, in its 2nd edition, has been conceived as an instrument of autonomous learning that serves as a model to increase the motivation of the student of Physiology in the degrees of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Importance of physiology in nursing

The first third of the 17th century is the starting point of the study of organic functions based on facts gathered by observation and experimentation. The discovery of the major circulation of the blood by William Harvey (1578-1657) is usually taken as a reference.

Published in 1628, Harvey’s work criticized the explanation usually given about the movement of blood and described what we know as the major circulation. It was one of the main issues on which the traditional Galenic physicians and the novatores clashed.

Engravings of the work of Thomas Willis. Portrait and underside of the encephalon, showing what is now known as the Willis polygon. Willis was the head of English iatrochemistry and had a decisive influence on the Valencian novatores doctors at the end of the 17th century. Thomas Willis, Opera omnia

Of those who opposed Harvey’s explanation of the major circulation of the blood, we can mention Matías García, professor of anatomy in Valencia between 1663 and 1687. He was one of the leading figures in the Faculty of Medicine in the central decades of the 17th century. He tried to rely on the Valencian anatomical tradition, which he qualified as Hispaniae sola anathomiae magistra.

Physiology examples

Claude Bernard would have made the surprising discovery that “inert matter” and “living bodies” are not the same thing. In living beings, intrinsic organic reactions occur, which Bernard called “inner environment”, these reactions occur at the cellular level and are oriented to the very conservation of living beings. Claude Bernard gave biology the status of an authentic science, however, he imposed clear limits on it, it will never be able to pronounce itself on the essence of life, although it will be able to elaborate laws relative to its physico-chemical conditions. For Claude Bernard, hypotheses would constitute the authentic scientific theory. Bernard’s thinking and his philosophy of experimentation is reflected in the Introduction to the study of experimental medicine

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Claude Bernard would have made the surprising discovery that “inert matter” and “living bodies” are not the same thing. To the intrinsic organic reactions that occur in living beings, Bernard called “internal mediu”, these reactions occur at the cellular level and are aimed at the conservation of living beings. Claude Bernard, gave biology a letter of nature as a true science, however, imposed some clear limits, he can never pronounce on the essence of life, although he will be able to develop laws related to their physical-chemical conditions. Claude Bernard, considered the hypotheses as the true scientific theory. Bernard’s thinking and his philosophy of experimentation is reflected in the Introduction to the study of experimental medicine.